Efflorescence is when soluble salts migrate to the surface of the masonry and crystallise as they dry, forming white deposits. This is a natural phenomenon and are usually caused by salts within the original clay that the brick is made from. However, they can also come from the ground or from adjacent masonry structures. If the efflorescence is recent, then these areas should be left to weather naturally. Heavy deposits can be removed using a dry brush. If the deposits are fairly insoluble and have been there for some time, then it is possible to tint them. However, this will not prevent new salts forming in the future.
Casi: St. Joseph, Missouri, USA (5 x Old English Red)
Casi: St. Joseph, Missouri, USA (5 x Old English Red)
THANK YOU! I bought a fixer upper that had a terrible case of efflorescence on the chimney. I was a bit wary that dye would be able to cover how extensive the efflorescence was, but everything else I had tried (muriatic acid) didn't work. Nine months later, I still love the results!
Covering Efflorescence
Covering Efflorescence
Covering Efflorescence with Dyebrick
Kristin: New York
Kristin: New York
Kristin: New York